Mining History Association

2014 Update

Cripple Creek and Victor Mining District

 

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This view of Battle Mountain from the east side of Victor captures two of the district’s most important mines, Stratton’s Independence (center) and the Portland (top of the hill).  The foundations of the Independence Mill are in the foreground.

A close-up view of Stratton’s Independence.  By 1928 the mine had produced $28 million in gold.  Winfield Scott Stratton’s discovery made him the first millionaire in the district.  The mine is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Portland Mine near the top of Battle Mountain was known as the “Queen of the District.”  It produced $60 million in gold and reached a depth of 3300 feet.  At its peak it employed 700 miners.

The Strong Mine, located in Victor at the base of Battle Mountain, became one of the top 10 gold producers in the district.  Sam Strong sold his claim early on for $60,000 and died in a barroom gunfight.


The steel headframe from the Cresson underground mine was preserved and moved to Victor when Cresson open pit was started.  The Strong and Stratton’s Independence are at the right.

An extensive system of trolleys connected the towns and the miners to the mines.  This trolley in Victor now serves as a visitor information center.

To preserve the deteriorating office and blacksmith shop buildings (red) from the Cameron Mine, they were relocated to the site of the Hoosier Mine and restored by the Cripple Creek and Victor Gold Mining Company.

The ore house from the Forest Queen Mine was also relocated and restored at the Hoosier Mine.  The collection of structures is now a roadside exhibit near Cripple Creek.

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Photo Credits: Mike and Pat Kaas

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