2013 Mining History Association Tours

 

Shullsburg and Mineral Point, WI

Tour Leaders: Mark Langenfeld,

Jim Jewell, and Tracey Roberts

June 9, 2013

 

 

PHOTO GALLERY – 1 of 6

 

CLICK ON A PHOTO TO DISPLAY A LARGER IMAGE

The MHA all-day field trip followed the back roads north from Galena to explore many of the historic mining locations in the Illinois and Wisconsin portion of the Upper Mississippi Valley Zinc-Lead Mining District.  Because of the long period of time since mining stopped, many of the old mines and mineral processing locations are completely reclaimed by either manmade or natural processes.  However, thanks to excellent tour leaders and the well-illustrated guide book, it was possible to gain an appreciation of the extensive amount of lead and zinc production that took place from the early 19th century lead rush until the closure of the last zinc mine in 1979. 

Most of the once bustling mining towns have evolved into quiet farming communities.  The well-kept homes and farms in towns like Hazel Green, New Diggings, Shullsburg, Darlington, and Mineral Point reflect the pride of their current residents, many of whom are descendents of early Cornish miners.  Impressive stone residences and commercial buildings reflect the skill of “Cousin Jack” stone masons.  A walk down Main Street in Mineral Point is like being transported back to Cornwall.  More Cornish homes are located on Shake Rag Street in the nearby Pendarvis State Historic Site.  A short hike up the trail to the Merry Christmas Mine showed where the miners of Pendarvis practiced their underground skills.

At the first stop, Mark Langenfeld (white shirt) described the life of the early lead miners and the mines in the area. 

 

One of the few intact “badger holes” which gave shelter to early miners.

The brick substation building is all that is left of the once extensive Kennedy Mine.  It was created in 1912 by the consolidation of the Glanville, Hoskins, and Mills Mines.

 

Noel Kirshenbaum and Diane Rosenberg were spotted doing some independent exploration of the sights in Shullsburg.  Were they looking for a breakfast pasty?

The Badger Mine and Museum in Shullsburg interprets local mining and town history.

 

A historical plaque explains how Wisconsin got its nickname, the Badger State.

 

The delicately handcrafted model of the Eagle Pitcher Mine shows all the stages of ore production and processing.

An historic mural in the museum shows many of Shullsburg’s buildings.


Photo Credits: Mike and Pat Kaas, Susan Canty

CLICK HERE FOR PHOTO GALLERY – 2 OF 6

 

 


All contents copyright 2011. This is a ZStudios website.